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Thread: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.




  1. #1
    Just Starting! snowmeow7's Avatar
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    Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    I have a group of intermediate students who are working on performing. I offer critiques in class, of course, but recently learned that when they meet to practice they are critiquing each other and some feelings have been hurt. I would like to spend some time in class focusing on how to critique each other constructively and in a positive way so that they can continue to work together as a group and hopefully avoid unnecessary drama!

    I am planning on teaching them the "compliment sandwich" method: positive feedback on what worked - feedback on what needs changed - more positive info. Any other ideas or advice on how to teach students to provide constructive and not hurtful feedback to their fellow dancers would be greatly appreciated.


  2. #2
    Advanced BHUZzer Ainsley's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    Off the top of my head, I would say that it's very important to be specific when providing criticism, to think in terms of what information a person needs to understand exactly what they're doing wrong so that they can fix it. Critics need to develop their observational skills. It isn't enough to know what doesn't look good to them; they need to be able to pinpoint why it doesn't look good to them.

    You might try providing your students with specific (helpful) vs. vague (sometimes hurtful) examples of criticism. For example:

    "Your elbows seem to be drooping at some points in the dance, and that's weakening the line of your arms."

    vs.

    "Your armwork is bad."

    or

    "You should try keeping your shoulders back and lifting your chest to give you more presence on stage."

    vs.

    "Your posture sucks."
    Last edited by Ainsley; 04-09-2011 at 07:46 PM.


  3. #3
    Advanced BHUZzer Ainsley's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    You might tell them that, before they critique a fellow dancer, they should be able to answer three questions:

    1) What didn't look good?
    2) Why didn't it look good?
    3) What can the dancer do to improve it?


  4. #4
    Advanced BHUZzer khalida777's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    I have found that the sandwich technique works very well for peer (and all) critiques and I also insist that the students give a lot more bread/compliments than meat! I remind them of the KISS formula -- "Keep It Simple Sweetheart" -- so that the critiques are constructive and brief, keeping to one or two points in the performance.

    Before the performances, I provide the students with a general outline as to what areas to be aware of: costume, entrance, timing, variation of moves, moves suitable to the music, eye contact, general technique, energy projection, use of props, and exit.

    Of course, I listen intently to the constructive critiques because they could be right, or not. Not that any of my students would say this, but hypothetically, if a student were to say, "I think that slow snake arms would have really worked well with that fast drum section", I would intervene and use the opportunity as a teaching moment.

    Hope this helps!


    Khalida


  5. #5
    I could get used to this! Meredith's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    The way you say things is as important what you say. Posture, facial, tone all need to convey a postive feeling. Saying "I liked your arms" with a blah unenergetic demenor is going to say something different than an energetic "I LIKED you arms!!!"

    M
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  6. #6
    Just Starting! snowmeow7's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    Thanks ladies! That really helps. Ainsley, I love those examples - I will definitely use that!


  7. #7
    Official BHUZzer Nabila-Nazem's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    ... and positive reinforcement when someone makes a correction. Praise, praise, praise, until the behavior becomes a habit. Let them know when you see improvement so that the critiquee (is that a word?) gets a little serotonin splash when they do something right; makes something that may feel unfamiliar feel "right" fast and makes it stick, too.
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  8. #8
    Mega BHUZzer Lara L's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    I've been thinking about using critique sheets, like we used to get back after music auditions way back when, so both performer and the folks giving the critique know what to focus on. For my current students, I'm looking at including:
    Posture
    Musicality
    Facial Expression
    Continuity of movement
    Mastery of movement

    But that's just what we've been working on- it could include arms, how well they're sticking to a particular style, variety of movement, etc. depending on what their current goals are. Details (in both compliments and critique) are important, and I do think writing things down is helpful to both parties! Haven't tried this out yet.


  9. #9
    Established BHUZzer Emma's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    I gave my students a talk about how to critique before we did a session on solo performances becasue it's the kind of thing they probably haven't thought about before.

    I suggested the compliment sandwich method, distinguish between your personal taste and a good/bad performance, only mention problems along with a solution (like Ainsley's examples) and make sure positives outweigh negatives because the negatives are what they will focus on. We're all still friends so I think it worked


  10. #10
    Ultimate BHUZzer Tourbeau's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    I guess I'm the dissenter. When I hear "Compliment Sandwich," I think "one piece of honest criticism that the person wanted to say, forcibly surrounded by two lame, phony, or pity compliments that they had to say." What does it tell you about how obvious the good things are if someone has to insist people to come up with two of them for every shortcoming? If a student hasn't reached the point where her dancing is already 2:1 "good" vs. "needs work," maybe she's not ready for this sort of public analysis...or you're dealing with a toxic group dynamic, which isn't going to be fixed by slapping a happy face on things.

    Unless your class consists of people who were raised by wolves or who are just out to hurt the critique-ee, most people are already self-aware and civilized enough to know not to say negative things without tempering them with something positive. "Don't say anything that would hurt someone's feelings if they said it to you" is an extension of The Golden Rule. I understand that the idea is to insist that people don't focus solely on negatives, but wouldn't this also be served by randomly pairing the critics and targets, and having them assess each other? People are naturally less harsh on someone if they know that person is going to be turning the spotlight right back on them. If everyone is in the same position of vulnerability, and if you break up the everybody-against-one-at-a-time mentality, you're less likely to get the pack-of-jackals effect.

    As a student, I personally feel quality is more important than quantity when it comes to feedback. Open-faced sandwiches are fine with me. If you've only got one meaningful positive to say, then just say that and skip whatever fluff you were going to say to fill out your "sandwich" regarding my energy, enthusiasm, or "how I really dazzled that rep from the Cincinnati office last week."


  11. #11
    Established BHUZzer LeylaFahada's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tourbeau View Post
    I guess I'm the dissenter. When I hear "Compliment Sandwich," I think "one piece of honest criticism that the person wanted to say, forcibly surrounded by two lame, phony, or pity compliments that they had to say." What does it tell you about how obvious the good things are if someone has to insist people to come up with two of them for every shortcoming?
    It's important that people hear what they're doing right for reasons beyond feeling good. If a dancer has a strength, she should keep using it. If her hip work is strong, telling her that means that she'll be conscious of it, will continue to do it, and will consider what makes that hip work strong. If you go on to point out that her arms are weak, you can link the two, e.g. "Your arms could be improved by using the same strength, precision, and shapes that you use in your hip work."

    Beyond that, students are in a vulnerable spot when being critiqued and the classroom should be a safe place to share your hard work. Having the other students make a list of everything you did wrong is not going to help. And even if they do, how many things can you fix at once?

    Besides, I have never seen a dance so bad that I couldn't think of two genuine compliments.

    Most people do not know how to give constructive feedback. They may be very nice and polite people, but that doesn't mean they know how to deliver constructive criticism in a field they're still learning.
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  12. #12
    A journey of ten thousand miles begins with a single post. anala's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    I think asking anyone but the instructor to give meaningful critique is playing with fire. It can create problems with the group dynamic in a troupe. There is a difference between dancers going over rough spots in a choreo with each other (My left foot is where? My palm is pointing sideways?) and commenting on each others core technique.
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  13. #13
    Mega BHUZzer Lara L's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    Quote Originally Posted by anala View Post
    I think asking anyone but the instructor to give meaningful critique is playing with fire. It can create problems with the group dynamic in a troupe. There is a difference between dancers going over rough spots in a choreo with each other (My left foot is where? My palm is pointing sideways?) and commenting on each others core technique.
    I think it is actually an important skill to develop. Knowing how to watch a dance and pick it apart for both the good & the bad & how to turn that into constructive criticism can help me evaluate my own dancing as well. We started this process in theater when I was 12. First we got to see the directors in action- for the first half of rehearsals, all we heard were the directors notes, then we started discussing rehearsals together as a group. As long as everyone knows we are all working together to improve the group as a whole and has a good model for how to give constructive criticism (and knows that in the end, the director's word is law, no matter what our personal opinions are!) it can actually bring a group together.

    I honestly think this is part of the reason I can now sit through a performance I don't particularly care for and still see the artistry and appreciate the talent presenting it. I can distinguish between bad performances and something that's just not my cup of tea. It also allows me to really dissect what I am doing, decide what I like, why, what needs to change and how I'm going to do it. It helps me tailor my performances to different crowds with different tastes/needs. It also lets me see precisely what needs to happen in the classroom! It's part of theater craft and I do consider it important.


  14. #14
    A journey of ten thousand miles begins with a single post. anala's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    It is a brave thing to do, I tried a few years back, but the troupe didn't take to it very well. At that time we had some serious interpersonal problems that got in the way of almost everything we did. I am too chicken shyt to try it again.


  15. #15
    Mega BHUZzer Lara L's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    Quote Originally Posted by anala View Post
    It is a brave thing to do, I tried a few years back, but the troupe didn't take to it very well. At that time we had some serious interpersonal problems that got in the way of almost everything we did. I am too chicken shyt to try it again.
    I can see how it could aggravate already existing problems! I think I'm very lucky to have had the theater role models that I did. I've run into some... interesting... directors since then, but the folks I first worked with (all those eons ago!) really had a goal of thoroughly educating us rather than just getting the show they wanted- and the results really were great shows! But I have to say, those folks were masters at manipulating their cast- but yes, we all came with common goals in the first place, and a willingness to put ourselves under the direction in the first place. The OP was specifically talking about a class situation, where I do think this can be taught. I am looking at starting a group specifically for folks who want critical feedback, and they are coming from all different backgrounds, so I think some initial direction is going to be needed. Senior members of my old troupe did this regularly, and encouraged newer members to help out too- but again, they had that model and that expectation from the beginning.

    I totally respect you for not bringing up something where you've already been burned! Every situation is different, but I think that argues even more strongly for the need for this to be addressed in a class setting, where a teacher has some control and can direct responses appropriately.


  16. #16
    Advanced BHUZzer CalgaryBibi's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    As a student in this situation, I'm with Tourbeau.

    First of all, as an adult educator in my "other life," I've learned that critique needs to be very direct and specific, or a lot of people simply misinterpret it or don't get it. Direct does not have to mean unkind. That said, I've learned to limit the number of corrections I give on one assignment. There may be multiple types of errors, but I focus on three or four major ones and let the others slide, so as not to be too discouraging or overwhelming. I think that many people can only focus on improving a few things at a time, so focus on the main issues.

    Anyhow, as a student, if I'm doing something wrong, I want to know about it, and I want to know that it's me who's doing it. I've noticed some students try to use questions or general statements to point out when another student is doing something wrong, and while I appreciate that they're trying to be tactful, I don't like that for a couple of reasons. 1) The other students either think it's not them who's doing it (even if it is) or, if they're like me, they think it's directed at them every single time, even if it isn't, which gets frustrating. 2) When people are open and honest with their criticism, then I feel like I can trust them, and I like to feel as if I can trust the people I dance with. It's sort of like wanting a friend to tell you when you have spinach between your teeth. Just tell me. I'd rather know and be able to do something about it than walk around having everyone think about how gross I look with spinach between my teeth.

    Furthermore, a couple of months ago I listened to a radio program in which the praise sandwich was discussed, and what the researcher who studied methods of critique found was that it doesn't actually work or make people feel better about the criticism. She found that people didn't hear the praise and heard only the criticism anyhow.

    Anyway, if I'm an intermediate student working with other intermediate students, then presumably we've all reached a level of commitment where we are working towards the same goal: we want our group to look sharp and synchronized. I feel that, as such, we should be open to corrections from one another, if someone notices something is off. Now, I'd say that that depends on the commitment level of the group. If it's a group of students who has a student show coming up and has chosen to get together for additional practices, perhaps they should not be critiquing one another. In that situation, not everyone has necessarily signed on for that level of critique. But if it's a formal, performing "troupe," then I think it should be clear from the outset that critique will be part of the process, and that it's not meant to put anyone down but to improve the look of the whole group. In that sense, the instructor might suggest that critique be approached from a "this is how the group is doing the move" approach, rather than a "you're wrong" approach.
    Last edited by CalgaryBibi; 04-10-2011 at 05:38 PM. Reason: To correct a word used in error.
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  17. #17
    Advanced BHUZzer CalgaryBibi's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    Cont'd...


    One thing I do struggle with as a dance student, though, is when people constantly shout out corrections during a number. Either 1) stop the piece and correct it and start again, or 2) address it directly with the person at the end of the number.
    I agree with the idea that criticism should be specific and be accompanied by a suggestion of how to improve. I've danced with one fellow student who says things like, "I've noticed the moves look better when so-and-so (another student) does them than when anyone else does them." How is that helpful? Critique should be limited to things like, "I think you need to turn your arm so that your palm is down"--i.e. specific corrections.

    I really like the suggestion of a sort of check list. I do this with my students with their assignments, so that they know very specifically what they did right as well as what they need to work on. They are given this checklist from the outset, too, so they know how they will be evaluated. I think this would be an excellent instructor tool. I'm not sure how applicable it would be to group rehearsals where one student wants to tell another about a specific technique, though.

    I completely agree that people also need praise. I disagree with the concept of always linking the praise and the criticism together. If that does work to soften the criticism, then it also serves to dilute the praise. As a student, I would feel like I was always hearing, "It was pretty good, but...." I'd rather get specific, direct criticism when I need it, but would also like to hear, "You nailed it!" without qualifications, when I deserve it.


  18. #18
    Ultimate BHUZzer Tourbeau's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    The subject of criticism almost always comes down to two things: (1) separating the focused students with high ambitions from the ones who don't prioritize improvement because they just want to have fun, and (2) admitting as teachers that we can't serve both groups equally well with a single curriculum. Assuming you're not talking about dancers who are cutting each other down for sport (and that may be the case, since the original issue occurred outside of a structured class exercise to learn critical assessment skills), the teacher has to make a choice. Are you going to let the cold pricklies of honest appraisal into the classroom, or are warm fuzzies going to rule the roost at the expense of maximized student potential? That's your decision to make, based on your goals as a teacher and the student body you serve.

    Other artistic disciplines consider learning how to "take it on the chin" part of their training. They see it as essential to the challenge of becoming a professional, where you're subject to the brutally candid opinions of critics and consumers. If you're going to put your art out there for public consumption, some abuse just comes with the territory. That's not to say their feelings don't get hurt when people say, "You stink!" or "That was awful!", but other artists and performers know they have to learn to deal with stupid, hateful, and sometimes unfortunately true comments. Since this particular example was a group of intermediate students with performing ambitions of at least some level, maybe more of this should apply to them.

    Our dance has a lot of students who want a deluded version of "No pain, all gain." They want to get better without ever being told they're not doing something properly. They want to live in a world where everyone always loves them and gets what they're doing. That's not realistic for the students who want to seek the higher levels. Sometimes it's not even realistic for the dabblers who just want to goof around and perform at an occasional hafla. As a teacher, you can set a policy that saying unnecessarily nasty things in class will have repercussions (I think you should), but we hurt ourselves by trying to bury everything but the pretty parts of the truth.
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  19. #19
    Advanced BHUZzer khalida777's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Tourbeau View Post
    [. . .] the teacher has to make a choice. Are you going to let the cold pricklies of honest appraisal into the classroom, or are warm fuzzies going to rule the roost at the expense of maximized student potential? That's your decision to make, based on your goals as a teacher and the student body you serve.
    In my experience, I don't have to make a choice. I've conducted peer critiques for a few years now and have found that students enjoy the warm and true fuzzies as well as receiving one aspect to improve upon from each student. All the comments are written down, presented orally, given to me, and then given to the performer later after I've had a chance to review the comments.

    When offered in the spirit of constructive criticism and team building, I have found this sort of exercise to be very valuable, not only for the performer in question, but also in terms of raising students' awareness as to how to appraise a dance and offer constructive criticism.

    I love seeing how my students' eyes shine when receiving their oral feedback from everyone. Then again, I am blessed with wonderful students!


    Khalida
    Last edited by khalida777; 04-10-2011 at 07:12 PM.


  20. #20
    Official BHUZzer Devora's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    Standard advice on critiquing public speaking often includes the idea of
    "Commendation before Condemnation" - I know that's sort of like the sandwich, but there's also "A spoonful of sugar helps the medicine go down," etc., and there's a grain of truth to that helping people to absorb critique.

    Ok, maybe this is a dumb or condescending idea, but if critiquing is going to be part of the class, what if the instructor includes a segment where she herself does a short performance for the students to critique, purposely including some subtly "too-busy" hands or a too-wide stance, poor zill-playing, etc., ask for feedback and then she can "critique the "critique-ers" by pointing out things they have missed and setting a tone where even the "best" dancer in the room has shown some poor form and making the whole exercise a bit more lighthearted?

    -Devora
    Last edited by Devora; 04-10-2011 at 08:08 PM.
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  21. #21
    Advanced BHUZzer Elibelinde's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    Quote Originally Posted by anala View Post
    I think asking anyone but the instructor to give meaningful critique is playing with fire. It can create problems with the group dynamic in a troupe. There is a difference between dancers going over rough spots in a choreo with each other (My left foot is where? My palm is pointing sideways?) and commenting on each others core technique.
    These were my thought too, right away.


  22. #22
    Advanced BHUZzer badriya_al_ahmar's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lara L View Post
    I think it is actually an important skill to develop. Knowing how to watch a dance and pick it apart for both the good & the bad & how to turn that into constructive criticism can help me evaluate my own dancing as well. ... As long as everyone knows we are all working together to improve the group as a whole and has a good model for how to give constructive criticism (and knows that in the end, the director's word is law, no matter what our personal opinions are!) it can actually bring a group together.
    I completely agree with the above. A few other Bhuzzers and I have been regular students of a teacher who regularly had us prepare pieces to perform for our class (completely informal setting, presented as works in progress) for group feedback. I definitely learned a lot about how to assess in general and also learned to apply that skill to watching my own video or thinking about my own dancing. Moreover because we all extended trust in each other's ability to be kind and honest, it really did bring us together as a group. Not every student in the group was ever going to perform outside of student recitals, but every student did take dance seriously enough to want to try their best, and we all respected that in each other, critiquing to the level that the student was at.

    It was the instructor who really made all this possible. We all had faith in her to keep the conversational tone constructive and appropriate--not that any of us were likely to get inappropriate, but still, it was important that she created that positive "let's help each other" environment. So I think that spending some class time talking about how to critique is a valuable thing to do.

    One critique technique that was often used in my class was "if you fix X, it will help you with Y." For example, if you work harder on keeping your shoulders back and down, it will help you project a confident image to your audience and create more room in your shoulder sockets for your shoulder rolls. Give a reason why X should be fixed, not just "you're doing X wrong."


  23. #23
    I could get used to this! alia t's Avatar
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    Re: Teaching intermediate students how to critique kindly.

    You have to teach students how to critique. I teach college writing as well as belly dance. I have seen train wrecks. I now have a process.

    1. Initially, share with no feedback allowed at all. Just witnessing. This is incredibly valuable all by itself. You can do this for weeks (or forever). Dancers are often the worst audience. They squint and frown at every move (even if they like it)--and they sit in the front row! Students need to learn how to be a good audience. The job of the audience is to support the dancer by watching with approving, encouraging facial expressions and applauding warmly at the end of each presentation.

    2. Next, discuss in advance a range of elements to notice--many of them subtle, such as presence, emotional timbre, floor patterns, etc. Set parameters for the feedback. Develop the concept of higher and lower order concerns (HOC and LOC). Work down. People will focus on the most niggling things (your elbows) when there are higher-order concerns (no floor patterns) that need addressing first.

    3. Only allow them to comment upon what they liked or what worked. I ask first if they have ever had anyone in their lives who is only too happy to tell them what they are doing wrong. Everyone raises their hand. It is more important, I tell them, to know what you are doing right, so you can do more of it. Again, this can go for several weeks, until people get good at finding the positive. It's there. If they have trouble, give them more HOC areas to look at.

    4. Let the presenter critique first. They can say what they liked about their presentation, and what they would like to have different. They can then ask the audience specific questions ("Where did my engagement slip?"), and you can limit how many questions they may ask.

    5. As your peeps get more skilled, they can progress to audience questions and more complex feedback. Peter Elbow's Movies of the Mind is a great tool for this stage, and for developing constructive feedback in general. Some of it needs creativity to apply to dance (it's about writing), but it is a left-field approach, and thus very helpful.

    It's good you are using this in an intermediate class. Peer critique is a valuable tool, and it helps those who critique as much (or more) as the one getting the critique. However, it is not suitable for everyone.

    You may want to limit it further (have another option for intermediate class, or make this a performance skills class) and build in the response guidelines--and only people who abide by them get to stay in the class.

    If it is an ongoing class and new people are joining, they might have to be there several weeks before being allowed to comment, and then follow the timeline above. But once you implement to the initial self-critique and couple it with specific parameters, that will help keep even new folks on the up and up.
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