+ Reply to Thread
Results 1 to 29 of 29
Like Tree8Likes
  • 2 Post By SamiraShuruk
  • 1 Post By EzmaSiddiqah
  • 1 Post By Tourbeau
  • 1 Post By Tourbeau
  • 1 Post By *Shira*
  • 1 Post By shaabichic
  • 1 Post By *Shira*

Thread: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!




  1. #1
    Advanced BHUZzer yameyameyame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,659

    Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    I need to know more about dabke. From what I understand so far, dabke is a line dance from many countries of the Levant, and it is slightly different depending on the country.

    It is also a type of music. At this point, I can listen to music and identify it as dabke, and recognize common dabke songs (although I can't name them yet because I usually hear them in a context where the name isn't mentioned). I also know the steps to the basic line dance, although I'm not sure what variation I am doing.

    Now, ever since I became more immersed in different types of folkloric music from the Middle East, I've started to notice that there are a lot of belly dancers who dance to dabke and call it Saidi. Why is that? Are they just confused? Because I guess what could cause confusion is the fact that the music is sometimes similar, and there are actual Lebanese dancers who do cane dance to dabke music. Also, whenever I see belly dancers do cane dance to dabke, the steps look very similar to the steps used in Saidi. Possibly because dabke as a line dance does have a similar hop and “horse-kick,” or maybe people are just confusing the two.

    So this makes me wonder, where does Lebanese cane dance come from? How is it different from Saidi dance with cane? When did people start doing solo performances to dabke music? And, finally, what is dabke, in the first place? If it’s a line dance, would you say it’s still dabke if a belly dancer performs dabke steps with a cane, by herself, or is it just dabke-flavored belly dance?

    Tell me all you know about dabke, or point me to where I can find some answers!


  2. #2
    Master BHUZzer SamiraShuruk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,028

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Debke is not just different from country to country. It can be different from village to village within the same country. BUT each country has it's own typical "flavor" or feel of debke.
    It's considered ok to to saidi to debke music- the rhythms and feel is so similar, but I think it's nice to throw in some debke steps and debke feeling steps. Suha Azar teaches a lovely Lebanese style cane workshop.
    Debke is the line dance- which can be done socially or modified for stage. When dancing with debke flavor, I consider it belly dancing (or saidi) with debke flavor (not actually debke).
    Last edited by SamiraShuruk; 07-26-2010 at 11:42 AM.
    leylalanty and Khalida like this.


  3. #3
    A journey of ten thousand miles begins with a single post. anala's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    10,863

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Ok..this is what I need (so embarassed) a very simple foot pattern with a count. Can you help a girl out?


  4. #4
    Ultimate BHUZzer bintbeled's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    5,333

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ws3zGD2vz4]YouTube - Dabke workshop 1[/ame]


  5. #5
    Advanced BHUZzer salomestar's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Montreal, QC, Canada
    Posts
    1,194

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    This will give you a good idea on historical facts:

    [ame=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dabke]Dabke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia[/ame]

    Very pround to say that I was there during the Guiness World record a year ago where the biggest dabke line ever was made right here in Montreal!


  6. #6
    Ultimate BHUZzer bintbeled's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    5,333

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYxQMbsmPaw]YouTube - How to dabke[/ame]


  7. #7
    EzmaSiddiqah
    Guest EzmaSiddiqah's Avatar

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    karim nagi has an awesome workshop on dabke dancing, includes much historical context. He teaches many different types of dabke, here is one:

    YouTube - KarimNagiClass's Channel
    Last edited by EzmaSiddiqah; 07-26-2010 at 01:16 PM.
    kiyaana likes this.


  8. #8
    A journey of ten thousand miles begins with a single post. anala's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2004
    Posts
    10,863

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Oh, Latifah! That was so good, I was really hoping they would rotate so I could follow from them from the back view...that is how desperately I am body dyslexic. I will get it!


  9. #9
    Ultimate BHUZzer Tourbeau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,801

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Quote Originally Posted by yameyameyame View Post
    Now, ever since I became more immersed in different types of folkloric music from the Middle East, I've started to notice that there are a lot of belly dancers who dance to dabke and call it Saidi. Why is that? Are they just confused?
    Saidi and Nawari are similar rhythms. If you have not been taught there is a slight difference, you will assume they are the same. It is a fairly safe bet that if Egyptian musicians are doing something that has a "doum...doum" rhythm, it is Saidi, and if Lebanese musicians are playing it, it is a debke. Most students don't learn at the level where they can recognize subtle rhythmic variations/songs/musicians/Arabic accents without being told, so yeah, they simply don't know any better.

    Because I guess what could cause confusion is the fact that the music is sometimes similar, and there are actual Lebanese dancers who do cane dance to dabke music.
    Debke is the Lebanese "baladi."

    So this makes me wonder, where does Lebanese cane dance come from?
    There isn't any historical evidence to prove that it couldn't have arisen independently--Lebanese people used walking sticks, too--but I think the general consensus is that they borrowed the Egyptian idea and Lebanese-ified it.

    How is it different from Saidi dance with cane?
    It tends to be faster, more energetic, with more aggressive twirling, and also with some debke steps thrown in for flavor, but there's a lot of gray area (and less Reda influence).

    When did people start doing solo performances to dabke music?
    When someone broke out of the line to show off? When someone got in an argument with a family member, refused to join the group, and started a new line by themselves? When the drummer decided to start dancing, too? I really can't recall seeing solo debke done in a theatrical setting outside of a belly dancer doing it. It's mostly a group thing. Also, the theatrical style is more elaborate than the social style.

    And, finally, what is dabke, in the first place? If it’s a line dance, would you say it’s still dabke if a belly dancer performs dabke steps with a cane, by herself, or is it just dabke-flavored belly dance?
    I'd say it's debke-flavored dance at that point. If it's not two or more people doing a pre-arranged sequence of repeating steps, and it's not a teaching demonstration, it's a solo dance with debke flavor.

    Tell me all you know about dabke, or point me to where I can find some answers!
    There are tons of threads here if you search on "saidi + debke," and thousands of videos at YouTube, including weddings, Maronite church festivals, and concerts by Lebanese singers, in addition to the ones that are labeled "debke"/"dabke." A number of teachers offer workshops on Lebanese style dance and Levantine line dancers.
    leylalanty likes this.


  10. #10
    Master BHUZzer SamiraShuruk's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Posts
    4,028

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Quote Originally Posted by EzmaSiddiqah View Post
    karim nagi has an awesome workshop on dabke dancing, includes much historical context. He teaches many different types of dabke, here is one:
    YouTube - KarimNagiClass's Channel
    Quote Originally Posted by Tourbeau View Post
    ...
    There are tons of threads here if you search on "saidi + debke," and thousands of videos at YouTube, including weddings, Maronite church festivals, and concerts by Lebanese singers, in addition to the ones that are labeled "debke"/"dabke." A number of teachers offer workshops on Lebanese style dance and Levantine line dancers.
    Karim Nagi is part Palestinian, isn't he? I'm pretty sure I remember from a long time ago a conversation in which he was thanking Kajira for labeling his workshops Palestinian debke, specifically.
    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PTfgwxIzC_4&feature=related]YouTube - Palestinian Dabke[/ame]

    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IgRHWiDuMWc&feature=related]YouTube - PALESTINIAN dabkeh a7la shabab falesteen (((PART 1)PATERSON, NEW JERSEY 973-380-2478[/ame]


  11. #11
    EzmaSiddiqah
    Guest EzmaSiddiqah's Avatar

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    I took workshops with Karim cause I didn't know how to debka when I went to middle eastern nightclubs and wanted to learn how. loved your first post Samira, seen that one before and it's just as fun to watch now!


  12. #12
    Ultimate BHUZzer bintbeled's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    5,333

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Karim is Egyptian but studied Palestinian debke. He teaches Palestinian style.


  13. #13
    Ultimate BHUZzer Tourbeau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,801

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Ah, to live in a culture where being a good dancer is a point of masculine pride... The more videos you watch, the more it becomes apparent that some of the fancier moves are done more by one gender than the other. The thigh-master, knee-cracking squats are typically the province of the guys, no matter what nationality they are. Guys also seem to be more prone to the recent phenomenon of coloring their debke with a little break dancing than girls are.

    Roxxanne Shelaby is Lebanese, and she teaches multiple varieties of Lebanese and Palestinian styles. I don't know of anyone teaching the Iraqi styles on the workshop circuit. Niran al-Ubaidi used to teach Iraqi debke, but I am not sure if she is still dancing.
    nasila likes this.


  14. #14
    Advanced BHUZzer yameyameyame's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Posts
    1,659

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Thank you guys, for all the info and videos (I had only seen a couple of these).


  15. #15
    Ultimate BHUZzer dunyah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2000
    Location
    Eugene, OR USA
    Posts
    6,471
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Quote Originally Posted by bintbeled View Post
    Karim is Egyptian but studied Palestinian debke. He teaches Palestinian style.
    I'm certain when he was here recently that he said he had studied debke in Lebanon, but perhaps that was in addition to earlier studies.


  16. #16
    Ultimate BHUZzer bintbeled's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2001
    Posts
    5,333

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Quote Originally Posted by dunyah View Post
    I'm certain when he was here recently that he said he had studied debke in Lebanon, but perhaps that was in addition to earlier studies.
    He certainly knows different styles, and can explain them. He mentioned a Palestinian troupe -- here in the States I think -- that he had spent time with, and showed the characteristic move that Palestinians add to the debke. Or maybe I'm remembering wrong, since my brain is currently stuffed full of JTE. ..c::


  17. #17
    Just Starting! Tera's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Cincinnati OH
    Posts
    1

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Quote Originally Posted by yameyameyame View Post
    I need to know more about dabke. From what I understand so far, dabke is a line dance from many countries of the Levant, and it is slightly different depending on the country.

    It is also a type of music. At this point, I can listen to music and identify it as dabke, and recognize common dabke songs (although I can't name them yet because I usually hear them in a context where the name isn't mentioned). I also know the steps to the basic line dance, although I'm not sure what variation I am doing.

    Now, ever since I became more immersed in different types of folkloric music from the Middle East, I've started to notice that there are a lot of belly dancers who dance to dabke and call it Saidi. Why is that? Are they just confused? Because I guess what could cause confusion is the fact that the music is sometimes similar, and there are actual Lebanese dancers who do cane dance to dabke music. Also, whenever I see belly dancers do cane dance to dabke, the steps look very similar to the steps used in Saidi. Possibly because dabke as a line dance does have a similar hop and “horse-kick,” or maybe people are just confusing the two.

    So this makes me wonder, where does Lebanese cane dance come from? How is it different from Saidi dance with cane? When did people start doing solo performances to dabke music? And, finally, what is dabke, in the first place? If it’s a line dance, would you say it’s still dabke if a belly dancer performs dabke steps with a cane, by herself, or is it just dabke-flavored belly dance?

    Tell me all you know about dabke, or point me to where I can find some answers!




    Salam/HI:

    I teach Lebanese Debke, as well as Turkish and other types of belly-dancing, & we are starting more classes soon...if interested please contact me at Nefertari22@hotmail.com

    Thanks!


  18. #18
    Official BHUZzer nefabit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Spokane, WA, USA
    Posts
    401
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Hi everyone!
    Very helpful thread!
    I'm confused thought - I watched this video with Karim Nagi KarimNagiClass's Channel - YouTube and some of the steps I see them doing are steps I've also seen in Armenian line dance . . . is Armenian line dance also Debke? Or is Armenian line dance done to debke? Or do they just happen to be similar?
    Thanks everyone! :)


  19. #19
    Master BHUZzer tigerb's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2003
    Location
    Madison, WI, USA
    Posts
    3,336
    Blog Entries
    4

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Quote Originally Posted by bintbeled View Post
    [ame=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4ws3zGD2vz4]YouTube - Dabke workshop 1[/ame]
    Somebody needs to learn how to hem jeans!
    Vashti Silks is my silk dye blog


  20. #20
    Ultimate BHUZzer Tourbeau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,801

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Quote Originally Posted by nefabit View Post
    Hi everyone!
    Very helpful thread!
    I'm confused thought - I watched this video with Karim Nagi KarimNagiClass's Channel - YouTube and some of the steps I see them doing are steps I've also seen in Armenian line dance . . .is Armenian line dance also Debke?
    I wouldn't think so. I'd expect it to be "syrto" or "oro" or whatever they call it.

    Or is Armenian line dance done to debke?
    You probably could do Armenian line dance to debke music, but it wouldn't be authentic that way. Detroit has a substantial Armenian community and a huge Lebanese one. I'm sure it's happened, and vice versa, too.

    Or do they just happen to be similar?
    I believe this is the answer you want. There are only so many ways for a group of people to dance in a line or a circle, so there are casual similarities in the traditions of any cultures that do this style of dance. The differences are in the details. Whether those similarities arose in the mists of history through contact between the groups or independently, I couldn't say. It's not like anyone has definitive proof that their ancestors invented the idea of stamping your foot.


  21. #21
    Official BHUZzer nefabit's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Spokane, WA, USA
    Posts
    401
    Blog Entries
    1

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Thank you Tourbau, that makes sense. It's true there are only so many possibilities. I recently did a party for a huge Bosnian community and they have a dance that is extremely similar as well. I think the concept is pretty universal, it's those little differences I'm having a hard time understanding. Need a workshop on such things up here in Spokane!!


  22. #22
    Ultimate BHUZzer *Shira*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Posts
    7,674

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Quote Originally Posted by nefabit View Post
    Some of the steps I see them doing are steps I've also seen in Armenian line dance . . . is Armenian line dance also Debke? Or is Armenian line dance done to debke? Or do they just happen to be similar?
    I was a folk dancer before I became a belly dancer, and I still love folk dancing! One of my folk dance teachers was Tom Bozigian, an ethnic Armenian who spent some time living in Lebanon playing drum in the clubs, before the civil war there. As a result of his background, he teaches both debke and Armenian folk dance. (I highly recommend his workshops for anyone interested in folkloric dance, by the way.)

    I've seen many similar step combinations used across multiple cultures, often cultures that are located very far from one another.

    Sometimes, it's easy to explain - for example, you'd probably expect to see some similarities between Greece and the Levant due to the fact that a lot of trade would have taken place across the Mediterranean. For that reason it's not surprising to see a strong resemblance between the Israeli hora (Hava Nagila) and the Greek hasapiserviko. You also probably wouldn't be surprised to see some steps resembling Scottish-style sailor's hornpipe in Suez canal zone Egyptian folkloric dance (yes, they're in there) due to the amount of European traffic that has passed through the canal over the decades since it was built.

    As for Armenian line dances and debke... as with many cultural things, there aren't easy answers. In general terms, Armenian music is quite different from the music of the Levant. I know a number of popular Armenian folk dances such as Ooska Gookas or Sev Acherov Aghcheek which look nothing at all like debke. However, I also know some that DO seem to have similar step combinations to debke.

    One thing to keep in mind is that populations don't necessarily confine themselves within the political borders we know today. Ethnic Armenian families over the centuries did not confine themselves neatly within the borders of modern-day Armenia. I know one Armenian person who was born and grew up in Iran. I know another who was born and grew up in Turkey, with an ethnic Turkish grandmother. I know a third who grew up in Lebanon. And so on. Over the centuries, a lot of ethnic Armenians left the homeland for religious reasons. The primary religion among Armenians is Eastern Orthodox Christianity, and they suffered a certain amount of discrimination as a result of living in Islam dominated areas. My friend who grew up in Iran had quite the stories about the discrimination her family experienced due to being Christian. If you look at a map, you'll see that modern-day Armenian is surrounded by the Muslim countries of Turkey, Iran, and Azerbaijan. So many families over the centuries relocated to places with larger Christian populations such as Syria, Lebanon, Palestine, etc.
    leylalanty likes this.


  23. #23
    Advanced BHUZzer shaabichic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Posts
    1,741

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    my favorite "style" of dabke is Palestinian. they really know how to get down
    so much fun to watch
    yameyameyame likes this.


  24. #24
    I could get used to this! LindaBintFarah's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Germany
    Posts
    139

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    I just loooove dabke! However I usually don't like the choreographed stage performances.
    For me dabke means party! With just 1 nice dabke song you can get the party started. I like the improvisation in dabke (I actually invented a step which my arabic cousins picked up and do now, too. So proud!). I think it's awesome that you can change the basic steps and improvise, give it more flavor by inventing steps, and still you're able to dance with people you've never met before just as long everybody knows the basic steps. You could say it's an ever changing dance that stays the same.


  25. #25
    I could get used to this! PracticalDancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Mid-Atlantic, USA
    Posts
    185

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Hi! (waves) I know I am really, really, late to this party; but, I am trying to piece through how to hear the differences between Debke music and Saidi music. Because, especially when dealing with certain songs (from Lebanon and Egypt), I only can tell the difference by the title, or knowing where the song is from, or a few other clues.

    So, have I got this right for Lebanese Debke in 4/4 vs. Saidi songs:

    Rhythm:
    a 4/4 Debke goes (with counts next to beats)
    1 Dum
    a tek
    2
    a
    3 Dum
    a Dum
    4 tek
    a

    whereas the Saidi rhythm is more like a heartbeat:
    1 Dum
    a
    2
    a
    3 Dum
    a
    4
    a

    or

    1 Dum
    a
    2
    a
    3 Dum
    a Dum
    4
    a

    or even

    1 Dum
    a (tek) optional
    2
    a
    3 Dum
    a Dum
    4 tek
    a

    But, in this last case, it is when lots of flourishes have been added to the drumming.

    And, I have been given to understand that melody wise, both may have mizmar, but Saidi will have lots of mizmar?

    Who can help me learn a bit more about the musical differences?

    Thanks!

    That is, I have been told that Debkes are typically 6 beats, but I have mostly found songs labelled as debke when they are 4/4.


  26. #26
    Ultimate BHUZzer *Shira*'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2006
    Location
    Iowa City, Iowa
    Posts
    7,674

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalaVA View Post
    I know I am really, really, late to this party; but, I am trying to piece through how to hear the differences between Debke music and Saidi music.

    That is, I have been told that Debkes are typically 6 beats, but I have mostly found songs labelled as debke when they are 4/4.
    I can tell the difference when I hear it, but I can't really explain it to someone else. I don't think in terms of rhythmic analysis AT ALL, because I hear many differences between debke and Saidi beyond just rhythm.

    My advice is to listen to a whole lot of songs in each genre, and after you've listened to enough of them you'll start to "feel" the differences. You don't necessarily need to know how to describe/articulate, just "feel".
    yameyameyame likes this.


  27. #27
    Ultimate BHUZzer Tourbeau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,801

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    I'm usually listening for the overall sound, too. It's sort of difficult to explain why it's different, so really the best way is high-volume listening until you get a feel for it. If you know a little Arabic and can decipher whether the singer is using Lebanese or Egyptian dialect, that can help. And sometimes you can guess without even hearing the song, just from the nationality and reputation of the singer.

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalaVA View Post
    whereas the Saidi rhythm is more like a heartbeat:
    1 Dum
    a
    2
    a
    3 Dum
    a
    4
    a
    I tend to think of this as being more of a fallahi rhythm (2/4 as 8 sixteenths), but maybe that's the bias of listening to Hossam Ramzy's "Rhythms of the Nile."

    Lately, I've been hearing a lot of dabke that doubles up the dum in the front. Earworm warning ahead...



    Actually, this is a good example of a lot of elements of a modern dabke. You've got the mawaal at the front, and a very characteristic musical bridge starting at 2:07 (listen for the five-dum accent around 2:31 and right before he starts singing again, also the men chanting in that segment).

    That is, I have been told that Debkes are typically 6 beats, but I have mostly found songs labelled as debke when they are 4/4.
    There are six-count and eight-count step patterns, but beyond that, I couldn't say. The Wikipedia article talks a little about six-measure vs. eight-measure patterns under "Other Types" Dabke - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, and I suspect the magic happens in the phrasing. If you arrange your songs so the sections (verse, chorus, bridge) are multiples of 24 counts, either a six-count or an eight-count dance pattern will come out evenly.


  28. #28
    I could get used to this! PracticalDancer's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Mid-Atlantic, USA
    Posts
    185

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Shira and Tourbeau,

    Thanks for commenting -- I need to come back and revisit your posts after I catch up on sleep, for I am running on about 4 hours now . . . (yawn)

    The clip you embedded, Torbeau, has the debke rhythm I was trying to describe, even if I count the count alignment wrong. I hear it as Dt DDt, which may mean I am hearing embellishments and not the main rhythm.

    The song that set me on this quest was this one: which I found on a thread elsewhere where it was debated as worthy of Cane or Debke, and most participants voted debke. I can "feel" some Saidi influences to this, but cane just doesn't feel right. Those ARE mizmars (correct plural?), aren't they?


  29. #29
    Ultimate BHUZzer Tourbeau's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    5,801

    Re: Dabke, Dabke, Dabke! Must know all about Dabke!

    Quote Originally Posted by AnalaVA View Post
    The clip you embedded, Torbeau, has the debke rhythm I was trying to describe, even if I count the count alignment wrong. I hear it as Dt DDt, which may mean I am hearing embellishments and not the main rhythm.
    That happens. Sometimes I swear it sounds like one of the drummers is playing a fast DDtktDtkt "baladi" in the background of "Sawt al-heda," and that song is as dabke as it gets. (LOL, as if I could get through a dabke thread without posting an Assi clip...)




    The song that set me on this quest was this one: which I found on a thread elsewhere where it was debated as worthy of Cane or Debke, and most participants voted debke. I can "feel" some Saidi influences to this,
    It can be difficult to tell which is the correct ethnicity of a song. I can see why there are elements of that song that might sound Saidi, but there are also elements that sound Lebanese, too. The vocals feel very Lebanese to me.

    but cane just doesn't feel right.
    You can do cane to dabke, as long as it's Lebanese cane, not Saidi cane. There should be some threads with video clips on Bhuz if you search.

    In terms of learning, there's nothing wrong with starting with the low-hanging fruit first and saving the songs that are harder to tell apart for later when you've built up more intuition. There are literally hundreds of hours of film (MTV-style music videos, live concerts, TV appearances) by Assi al-Hellani (عاصي الحلاني) and Fares Karam (فارس كرم) on YouTube, and if it's by them and it isn't a ballad, there's a pretty good chance it's a dabke. Actually, Fares is scheduled to tour the US in May, so depending on where you live and your budget, you might be able to catch him live. The only dates they have announced so far are Atlantic City on 5/12 and Las Vegas on 5/26, but they may add more shows.


Similar Threads

  1. Lebanese Dabke Help, Please
    By Adishakti in forum Music Traditions & Styles
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 08-27-2007, 08:29 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
Statistics
  • Threads 40,657
  • Posts 591,055
  • Members 38,019
  • Welcome to our newest member, Maggie 1157


1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 45 46 47 48 49 50 51 52 53